Striking teachers dare Education Ministry to go to court
 
Posted on: 2013-Oct-25        
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Members of the striking Coalition of Concerned Teachers Association have dared the Education Ministry to go to court if it was that the strike embarked on by the coalition is illegal.

General Secretary of the Coalition, Raymond Boakye Dankwa, also challenged the Education Ministry as well as the Fair Wages and Salaries Commission to quote the portion of the constitution or the Labour Ac,t which makes their strike illegal.

The coalition members have laid down their tools in protest over unpaid capitation grants and other unpaid allowances.

In Kumasi, Nhyira FM’s Ohemeng Tawiah reported that the strike is in full force. According to him, the teachers reported to school but had failed to teach.

Pupils in the Ahuda, Islamiya and Ahuda Primary schools have all been left wandering about in their schools, Tawiah reported.

In the Brong Ahafo Region, however, the strike was yet to make the needed impact.

Skyy FM’s Kuuku Abban reported that the teachers have not heeded to the call for the strike and have reported to work.

They were however, concerned about delays in payment of their arrears. The Regional chairman of the Coalition therefore assured that the strike will be in full force by tomorrow.

Both the Fair Wages and Salaries Commission and the Education Ministry have described the strike as illegal with the latter asking the striking teachers to return to the classroom.

But Raymond Boakye Dankwa insists their strike is legal and until their concerns were addressed, they will not return to the classroom.

He told Joy News’ Francisca Kakra Forson that they were ready to meet the education ministry in court.

He said they have followed all the necessary procedures before embarking on the strike.

Meanwhile the Executive Coordinator of the Labour Rights Institute, Mohammed Affum, has attributed the strike to indiscipline by all stakeholders as a well as a lack of understanding of the labour law.