Supreme Court orders Woyome to refund Ȼ51m
 
Posted on: 2014-Jul-29        
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The Supreme Court has ordered business man Alfred Woyome to refund a total of Ȼ51.2 million judgement debt payment he received between 2009 and 2010.

Judges at the highest court ruled the National Democratic Congress financier had no valid contract to be paid that amount of money.

The ruling follows a review of the court's own earlier decision sought by former Attorney General Martin Amidu who insisted that Woyome, like Waterville and Isofoton, had no valid contract to be paid any amount by the state in judgement debt.

The Supreme Court few months ago ruled in favour of Amidu and directed Isofoton and Waterville to pay back monies paid them in judgement debt.

It said the contracts which formed the basis for the claims by the two companies did not exist in law for want of Parliamentary ratification as required by law.

It however refused to make a ruling on the Woyome matter because the matter was pending at the High Court.

Not satisfied with the ruling of the court, the citizen vigilante, as he would describe himself, went back to the Court asking it to review its own decision on Woyome and the Attorney General whom he joined to the suit against Waterville and Isofoton.

Woyome had been paid 51. 2 million in three tranches of 17 million each under pretext of providing financial engineering to government for the construction of stadia for the CAN 2008.

He had sued the state, accusing the erstwhile Kufuor administration of abrogating a legitimate contract he signed with the government and for failing to pay for the financial engineering.

The Attorney General did not defend the case until a default judgment was handed to the plaintiff and the amount paid in full.

An Audit report issued in 2010 raised concerns about the manner in which the monies were paid, which created a huge controversy in the country at the time.

The controversy led to the resignation of Betty Mould Iddrisu who had been reshuffled to the Education Ministry.

The new Attorney General Martin Amidu then filed a case of defrauding by false pretence and causing financial to the state against Mr Woyome with the aim of retrieving the amount paid to him.

No sooner was Amidu dismissed from government for allegations of misconduct.

He had since then mounted a crusade to retrieve monies he was convinced were illegally paid to the companies.

Tuesday's ruling is the third of such ruling in favour of Martin Amidu, having already secured judgement against Waterville and Isofoton.